Tag Archives: my writing

Queer Summer Reading guest post!

My guest post for Queer Summer Reading about a few of my favorite fictional sex-repulsed aces is up! Here’s the intro:

Growing up, I never saw anyone like me in fiction—a sex-repulsed asexual person. This left me basically thinking I was the only person on the planet who hated the thought of ever having sex. So it’s amazing to now get to read about characters who actually have similar feelings to mine; it means so much to finally see myself reflected in stories. Here are a few sex-repulsed/averse ace characters who have especially resonated with me (all of whose names, coincidentally, start with “N”).

If you haven’t heard of Queer Summer Reading, you should definitely check it out.

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A+ Ships: Wes and Nash, MR. MARCH NAMES THE STARS

I wrote a guest post for C.M. Spivey’s “A+ Ships” series!

C.M. Spivey

A+ Ships is an irregular feature celebrating relationships in fiction between characters that fall along the asexual spectrum. For more information, see the A+ Ships FAQ.


Our post today comes from Tabitha. This book sounds awesome and I look forward to checking it out. Thank you, Tabitha! 

Book cover, black feather quill in ink pot over an aquamarine background, text reads Mr. March names the Stars, Rivka Aarons-Hughes Click for Goodreads

Wes loves his life traveling the Pagan festival circuit, but he loved it more when he wasn’t harangued by women a little too fond of his picture in a popular charity calendar—a calendar that mucked up his bio by stating that he’s single, but leaving out that he’s not straight.

Wes’s appeals to the company to change the bio come to nothing until Nash, a lawyer from the company, shows up and promises to do all he can to fix the problem. But though Wes quickly grows fond of Nash, and the interest seems mutual, the calendar problem shows…

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Interview: Tabitha O’Connell

I was featured on Asexual Artists today! Thank you so much to Lauren for running the site and for interviewing me. 🙂

Asexual Artists

Today we’re joined by Tabitha O’Connell. Tabitha runs one of my absolute favorite asexual blogs: Asexual Representation. She also happens to be a phenomenal writer and has just sold her first short story (YAY!). Tabitha is a fellow ace feminist, which is always awesome to see. I could not be happier to feature her on Asexual Artists. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I write nonfiction about asexuality and feminism, poetry (once in a while), and fiction of all lengths. My fiction is usually either fantasy or contemporary/realistic, and I like to explore interpersonal conflicts and complex relationships, awkward situations, and characters feeling alone and navigating social spheres where they don’t really fit.

I just recently had my first short story published; it’s a bit different from what I normally write in that it’s a light, happy…

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First short story published!

My first published short story, “The Well”, appears in the April 2016 issue of Vitality. It’s super exciting having some of my fiction published! I wrote this story last year, right around the time that I wrote my first post on this blog, and it was actually Vitality itself that inspired me–discovering a magazine dedicated to non-tragic stories about queer characters made me want to write one of my own. “The Well” features an all-female community and an aro-ace protagonist. In most of my stories with ace protagonists, the character’s asexuality comes into the story in some way (whether they’re discovering it, coming to terms with it, or coming out to someone else), but in this one, it’s just a brief aside and not where the focus lies.

I had fun writing this story, and while, sadly, this is Vitality‘s last issue, I’m glad that I was able to be a part of it!

New article out on The Mary Sue!

I wrote an article about the impact of leaving Rey, and other female characters, out of kids’ merchandise, which you can read over at The Mary Sue!

Leaving Rey out—or Black Widow, or Gamora—tells boys that women aren’t worth identifying with. That women may be heroes onscreen, but when it comes to re-enacting the movies with your action figures, it’s the men who should be saving the day.